Memories of London

Reading someone’s article brought back fond memories of my family’s’ trips to London, England. Specifically, what I’m thinking about now are the times we were in a Tube (Subway, properly known as the London Underground) station with a long curving staircase down from one platform to another when we needed to change trains. Often, when my father would pick up one end of the stroller to carry it down, some random stranger would rush to help him so that he didn’t have to do it alone, or enlist one of his older children (we were pretty strong, having done it before, but being short back then it really was a help.) Said person would help, against my father’s protests, the entire way down and sometimes, offer to help us the rest of the way. It’s happened more than once, and it makes me smile.

Simchas for all

Imagine going to an engagement party/vort. YAY!, right?

Now imagine going to a vort after a whole day of being on your feet setting up for and hostessing another party. Imagine that you’re hungry, tired, and not fond of crowds. Oh, yeah, and you don’t know anyone there. And to top it off, you are severely under-dressed.

I was SO happy for the kallah, but a small part of me was cringing for myself inside. I was sort of glad at times like that that I don’t know anyone, because it would have been almost worse if I did.

Thank you to all the people who smiled at me. I can’t say it more, or better. Thank you.

My sister Faigy

I wasn’t going to write about this more. I commented on it yesterday, and honestly, the topics here hit us all in such raw places that I was scared to say something.

But I cried last night for a long time. Even as I wondered if these are the final footsteps of the Redemption (today! today!), I cried for the cost they came at. I cried for someone who, were she living, I doubt I would have much to say to. She helped other Jews leave the fold, while I am, in my own small way, ‘in Kiruv’. But she had a Jewish soul. She had a soul, period. She was a tragic casualty in the crazy confused world we live in. And it burns me to the core.

I can’t help but compare it to the other precious souls we lost last year. Though they tried to hitchhike, no-one blames them or says that, heaven forbid, they deserve their fate. Here, people are saying that the ‘religious nuts must be so happy she got what she deserved’ for leaving. Looking at the levayah, I don’t think any Jew would actually believe that.

They were prayed for by millions. How many people prayed for her? Very few, because who knew?

They were mourned by the world. Her family and friends are mourning, but are we?

They brought us together and reminded us that we are stronger as a whole. What will we learn here?

Faigy Mayers is teaching us how vast and wide-spread that whole is. It’s time to bring our people back together, forever.

It’s too late to prevent our loss. But if we take it to heart, if we can all live peacefully, G-d will bring us home. So don’t be afraid to cry. You’re in good company.

Hello All!

Our tech admin would be laughing at me for taking so long to figure this out, but better late than never.

I just found the feature that lets me see how many visitors this site is getting. It’s so amazing to see them all pouring in!

Just wanted to let you all know what a smile you put on my face! Keep on coming.

PS. Feedback makes us smile, and helps us do a better job in bringing you content. Please drop us a few words!

Impact

A week or two ago, I was walking through the neighborhood when two little girls passed by on bikes. The second fell off about three feet past me. Concerned, especially since she might have fallen swerving past me (though I was nowhere close), I went back to see if she was ok.

Her sister told me that she was fine, and the girl sprang to her feet. All was well, but as left, I mentioned that I knew someone who even with a helmet, nearly smashed his skull open riding a bike. Not the most encouraging or forceful message, and I wasn’t surprised when they just walked on. I wished I could have done a better job.

Or could I have? Today, when walking along a nearby route, I saw two girls biking down a hill, with helmets. And I’m 95% sure they were the same people.

Spreading the sunshine

Today was the second day of my camp job. At dismissal, I was ‘asked’ to do a job that wasn’t technically mine– but someone had to do it, and it was impossible to explain that that someone wasn’t me.

When I got back, another parent (one whom I nearly gave the wrong child this time yesterday!) complimented me on and on about my positive attitude even at the end of the day. It was so kind, and made a huge difference to me.

 

Ps. The next time I saw the first parent, they were much more polite. What the other mother said had a big impact on both of us, it seems.

Anonymous Thank You

Someone did something very kind for me today. I can’t tell you who it was, or what they did, or why. I was practically sworn into secrecy. But I still appreciate it and I still want to share this kindness with the world.

THANK YOU

Mim tells me that she’s getting scared for Tisha B’av. Every act like this helps us both feel a little better. (More on that soon.)